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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 187 (some duplicates have been removed)
by the taliban. the pakastani girls are demanding an education. the economic crisis and some are ready to celebrate. and he may be -- they may be numbered two on the ticket, but the vice presidential candidates traded verbal blows last night as election day lems. -- looms. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. today people in pakistan observed a day of prayer for malala yousafzai. she is a 14-year-old girl shot in the head by the taliban. her crime was to campaign for girls like herself to have an education. the attack has been condemned across the globe. our journalist was the first to report from her home town. >> prayers across pakistan have been dedicated to malala. the 14-year-old remains in critical condition, three days after a taliban assassin shot her in the head. just two weeks ago the girl that has become the focus of worldwide attention was filmed at home, helping her younger brother with his work. it is for her own writings she became famous. the school flag flies at half mast. the students do not know when she will return here t
either because they are frustrated or because they want to get more training or education. some people are finding jobs. economists have looked at different calculations of which is the better factor -- the bigger factor, or people dropping out or getting more education and training and my understanding is that there are equal roles being played by each for spirit -- each force. but there are definitely some dropping out. some of that is the baby boom generation starting to retire. it may not be a "dropping out," but people choosing to retire and leave their jobs. some older people may have lost their jobs and cannot find new ones and are taking early social security benefits. there is some of that. host: mr. r doane, the labor force participation -- mr. nardone, a labor force position rick, please explain this. guest: the take the people who are employed in those who are unemployed and combine them and you get what is called the labour force. divide that by the population in at 16 and over and you're of the force participation rate. is the proportion of the population that is either e
class does not have its taxes go up and making sure that we invest in education and infrastructure and innovation. the alternative choice that has been presented is that we should lower taxes for millionaires and billionaires and in order to pay for that, we have to turn medicare into a voucher program. we have to get investments in education and innovation, research and development, border security, diplomatic security. that is not the right answer. that is not the right approach. we have tried it. it did not work. we should not go back. >> [inaudible] and the former regional security officer have both suggested there were efforts from the u.s. embassy in libya to have more security at the state department. state department officials would not let it happen. why? why would the state department not listen to these men on the ground in libya who wanted more security? >> as i said, there is no question that the results of what happened in benghazi is not acceptable. four americans killed is not an acceptable situation, and that is what the president moved so quickly to ensure that an
education and access to a quality education for all of america's citizens and public broadcasting has been an agency and part of the machinery that has delivered quality education at no cost to the public for many, many years. >> bill: when you say at no cost to the public, it's $450 million a year. that's a lot of taxpayer cost. but let me just ask you this: i like pbs programming especially for kids. you did a nice job for a long time on that and it was very educational. the sesame workshop, which is the big driver on pbstv, their assets, according to the irs 2011 filing, $356 billion. that's what the sesame workshop is worth. so i'm going to submit to you, mr. burton, that they can compete in the free marketplace like cartoon channel and others because we're in an era where we have to bring down the spending. of two do it. and you say? >> i say you're missing the point, bill. if you're going to focus on the $414 million, you are missing the point. america has always claimed to be the nation that wants to provide a quality education to all of its citizens. and i'm not saying that pbs i
cut down talks completely on jobs and wanting to cut the education credit. the president signed the "dream act," and hundreds of thousands of students are able to get their education. i am educated. i put my son through law school. it is his birthday today on columbus day, october 8. we moved to california when i was 8 years old. my mother remarried and my stepfather was a marine at camp pendleton and coronado. host: thank you for the call. guest: everything she said, i disagree with. she did talk about lowering the cost of education for kids getting into college. that is significant. she also talked about the blue part of the state that has really struggled. over the last 30 or 35 years. it's now starting to come back with a gas and oil industry, making sure that it is safe, with the steel industry, it's starting to come back. and certainly with the automotive industry. we have to be positive about those kind of things. if we continuously be rated president and start saying government is not working, voters react to that. jay and i know that go to washington or columbus, they d
the grandmother and build new education and yet segregation, jim crow law rose above it and insisted that his grandson's rise above its. fight, participate, eliminate but do not be consumed by it. in so many ways we talk about the founding fathers and yet the house fell in a way because of the contradiction and the generation rebuilds it. frederick others see -- frederick and others. do we today in our law and our culture give enough credit to that refunding? >> you think of the great moments in our history. we talk about of course the revolution, certainly the constitution that we celebrate now, 225 years. it was all coming apart and the country as we know today is reshaped after the civil war. the constitutional law what would it look like if there were no 14th amendment to the states. there is so much that goes beyond the war. i tell my clerks we have to go to gettysburg. this isn't just about pulling these little threads out of what we do every day about journalism and original was on and we argue it is much bigger than that. i see some people here who argue before the court. i'm not once
of this a very serious thinker has written a very serious book. having overcome his education at harvard university and his upbringing in west virginia, today a towering figure of the conservative movement wrigley so . professor of government at claremont college. the kill editor with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet, modern american conservative thought. political ideas. indeed, his edition of the federalist papers published by segment is the best selling edition in the ad states. he contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the wall street journal, los angeles times, writes politics and policy review, national review, weekly standard among other journals. a senior fellow at the claremont institute, one of our closest thing tank allies which takes as its mission to restore the principles of the american founding. he is the intellectual muscle of that mission. he teaches in two of the programs. the program and the lincoln fellow program. most important, he is the editor of the claremont review books, the quarterly publication of the claremont institute. perhaps you are famili
heard fissured the university of texas at austin, the affirmative action policies in higher education. abigail fisher was denied admission to the university of texas at austin in 2008. fischer sued, arguing that racial minorities with worse credentials were accepted ahead of her because she was white. she contend that the schools use of of race in nations violates the u.s. constitution's guarantee of equal protection. a previous court ruling allows race to be one factor considered to achieve diversity. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> well, i get to say that this is case of love and 345, fisher of the of texas at austin. and you get to say -- >> general suter trained me too well. chief justice and members of the court, may i please the court. the essential issue here is whether the university of texas at austin and can carry its burden of proving that its use of race as an nation plus factor and the consequent denial of equal treatment, which is the central mandate of equal protection clause to abigail fisher met the two test of strict scrutiny, which are applicable. >> before we ge
that america has a third world infrastructure. we need to spend more on education. one of the concerns that i raise in my book is america has become the country with the least equality of opportunity of any of the advanced industrial countries. >> equality of opportunity meaning -- >> that the life chances of a child are more dependent on the education and income of his parents than in any of the other advanced countries for which there is data. and the main reason for this is lack of equality, of opportunity for education. for a good education. >> and when you look at education statistics in the u.s. compared to rest of the industrialized world, we fell to what? >> we're way in the middle. we-- we are not at the top of the league any more by a long shot. we need to spend more on technology if we want to be competitive in the world. >> why didn't we do this in the stimulus program that was enacted? >> i think we should have done more. i think the -- >> was it commit political compromise that prevented the stimulus program being what might have met your approval. >> it was partly a political c
that the narrow focus on racial diversity in higher education has eclipsed larger issues of class and the quality, among colleges and universities. so, in advance of the u.s. supreme court's oral arguments in fisher versus university of texas, which will take place next week, the century foundation put together a report which i am going to outline which looks at the question, is it possible to create racial and ethnic diversity without using race, and instead paying attention to larger issues of economic equality in our society. it is called a better affirmative action. it makes three main points. the first, that racial affirmative action is likely on its way out. affirmative action based on race was always meant to be temporary by those who originally envisioned it, a deviation for a period of time away from the non-discrimination principle. but now there are both legal and political forces that appear to be bringing affirmative action to a end. to begin with, it is highly unpopular among average american voters. if you look at the supreme court briefs in the fisher case, you would think there i
the educational experience of all pupils. >> caller: that's good. i guess it goes back to the case the was deemed moot anyway, but the fact of the matter is when you are laying on that table and you are about to have brain surgery, it doesn't matter what color the surgeon is. i don't care if he is black, white, it doesn't make any difference. the fact of the matter is if they were granted admission to school simply based on the fact of their skin color, that in itself is discriminatory. >> host: okay. carroll. oklahoma city. independent. good morning. >> caller: good morning. i would say that i hope [inaudible] they don't intervene because that affirmative action of white women versus african-american women for jobs and positions and i think it is being used in that respect. hopefully the supreme court will step down and allow it to continue as it is. >> host: okay. new hampshire. the democratic call. good morning, now three. what are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among
the first question i went to princeton university i hope these guys are good to be well-educated and know something and the first question is where is your tomahawk? the borderland follows me everywhere. there was no way to escape it. the only way through it and so i realized there are not that -- i wouldn't be the barometer by which a lot of people what, you know, understand or judge native people so i realize the importance of my work and that her presentation. >> one of the things i like about your book is balance and that's important that type of community based upon balance but in the book we had a lot of balance, we balance the topics dealing with sensitive issues that might be sensitive to a non-native person like mike cherokee grandmother was a cherokee princess for the tribal community for enrollment and then you dealt with tough issues like the history of christopher columbus so there's a history lesson and then the ler enjoyment of reading the book. how did you decide what to include and what not to include in this book? >> guest: writing the book happened faster than my resear
and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking and national review among other journals. he's a senior fellow at the claire monththe mission to e ree the principles of the american found ming is the intellectual muscle of the i guess -- mission pings. he teaches in the key fellow programs. the fellows program and the lincoln fellows program. most important he's the editor of the clermont review books. a public cage of the clermont substitute. i encourage you to sib croi
for their college education and she's voted to increase taxes on the middle class through the ryan plan. all of this in order to keep tax breaks for multi-millionaires and tax breaks and subsidies for corporations who ship jobs overseas. we're going to reduce the deficits by bringing home our troops from afghanistan, by making sure that we create jobs right here in the district, by making sure that we decrease taxes on the middle class and small businesses, and by allowing medicare to negotiate drug prices with our pharmaceutical companies so that we can tackle the real problem, which is our health care costs and eliminate unnecessary procedures and redundant tests. >> all right, thank you, dr. ruiz. congresswoman, you have one minute. >> i don't think he understood the question, because what he just said, he's going to reduce the debt by not having so many medical tests, which, by the way, is a major part of obama care. obama care is what cut medicare by $716 billion on. let me tell you a few specific things i would do immediately to cut the debt. first of all, i would repeal obama care as
schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> 5% of those currently serving in the u.s. congress are latino. despite the u.s. population. 2.5% in congress are asian or pacific islander. even though they make up 5% of the nation's population. those disparities could all change come november 6th. a report to be issued tomorrow at a new american leaders project examines how demographics and redistricting have created a record number of opportunities for immigrant communities to gain political office. this chart shows the breakdown of first and second generation candidates running for congress by their ethnicity. now, note that almost 70% of candidates represented here are latino with polls showing the majority of them expected to win their races. asian americans could see changes too. for example, new york state could be poised for its first asian american to congress. that person with me now. assembly woman grace payne is running in the new york's 6th congressional di
because they recognize that the path of education has to be open to every society, and we need to have kids learning from each other in the classroom, on the campus, on the fields of competition and everywhere. >> and so mr. taylor, what's the matter with that argument? how is it that your interpretation and those who are going to be arguing on the same side that you are is that affirmative action is actually serving as a crutch and that it hurts the very people that it is designed to serve and help? >> well, let me begin by saying i agree with mr. adigbuleh that a racial adversity and especially intellectual diversity is a good thing to have. the question is how far you're going to compromise other values, such as merit selection and the well-being of the individual students to accomplish that. by using very large racial preferences, much larger than most people realize in terms of the academic gaps between entering students who are black or hispanic or white or asian, there is kind of a hierarchy with asians at the top in terms of academic qualifications. by using very large racial p
quality education at no cost to the blicoran manrs ilheu atos tblt'50li r. 's lot of taxpayer cost. but let me just ask you this: i like pbs programming especially for kids. you did a nice job for a long time on that and it was very educational. the sesame worhop, which i e b dr pv, tr tscog he irs 2011 filing, $356 billion. that's what the sesame workshop is worth. mrrtthhening to subt to yo ethermapl like cartoon channel and others because we're in an era where we have to bring down the spending. of two do it. and you say? sousi t if'r g to focus on the $414 million, you are missing the point. it citizens.always claimed to be and i'm not saying that pbs is perfect and you're quite right, the sesame workshop canake care of itself and we don't need to wor about big bird. he'sonnaein 'sna o tergue bill, is how do we do the job of educating america's children and are we going to make them political footballs in this mpaign? pu- heepul tvet 0 ioyero pbs that education over the television airways directed at children is going to crumble and that will hurt kds? >> it's going to suffer
jobs. we cannot slow up on education because that's the engine that is going to give us the economic growth and competitiveness that we need. and we are not going to slow up on the whole idea of providing for affordable health care for americans, none of which when we get to talk about health care is as my, as the governor characterized, characterized. the bottom line here is that we are going to, in fact, eliminate those wasteful spending that exist in the budget right now. a number of things i don't have time because the light is blinking that i won't be able to mention, but one of which is the $100 billion tax dodge that, in fact, allows people to take their post office box offshore, avoid taxes. i call that unpatriotic. i call that unpatriotic. that's what i'm talking about. >> moderator: governor? palin: well, the nice thing about running with john mccain is i can assure you he doesn't tell one thing to one group and then turns around and tells something else to another group, including his plans that will make this bailout plan, this rescue plan even better. i want to go back t
't afford to gut our investments in education. or clean energy. or research. and technology. we can't afford to roll back regulations on wall street banks or oil companies or insurance companies. that is not a jobs plan. it's not a plan to grow our economy. it's sure not a plan to strengthen our middle class. we have been there. we have tried that. we're not going back. we are moving forward. we've got a different view about how we create jobs and prosperity in this country. [applause] this country doesn't just succeed when just a few are doing well at the top. succeed is when the middle lass gets bigger. our economy doesn't grow from the top down. it grows from the middle out. we don't -- we don't believe that anybody's entitled to success in this country. but we do believe in opportunity. we believe in a country where hard work pays off. and responsibility is rewarded. and everybody's getting a fair shot. and everybody's doing their fair share. and everybody's playing by the same rules. that's the country we believe in. that's what we've been fighting for for the last four years. that's wh
days to go, and we're focused on voter registration, getting our voters more educated, and then out to vote, and when you talk about all those polls, one poll up, one poll down, what i'm focused on is the polls opening, at least in pennsylvania and many other places across the country, on november 6th, because the only poll that matters is the poll on election day. polls open at 7:00 in philly, close at 8:00. that's what we're talking about. >> okay. let's take a look, president obama spoke to his hollywood backers last night at an l.a. fund-raiser. it sounded like he realized how bad things went. he wasn't as good as you were right now, mayor nutter, but let's take a look. >> everybody here is incredible professionals, such great friends, and they just perform flawlessly night after night. i can't always say the same. back in 2008 everybody always remembers the victory, but they don't always remember the bumps in the road. things always look good in retrospect, but in the middle of it we made all kinds of mistakes. we goofed up. i goofed up, but the american people carried us forwa
for scientific research and education, hall said this about scientists who come before his committee to talk about the reality of climate change. quote, i think we ought to listen to them. i just don't think we ought to mind them. that's a theirer. their colleague jim sensenbrenner has called the idea of climate change an international conspiracy and science tisk fascism. heard enough? don't forget about todd akin. he has a slot on the science committee, he and his theory that in legitimate cases of rape the woman can't get pregnant. >>> up next, republicans probably figured they had the senate seat in ads all wrapped up, but richard carmona has come out of nowhere and coming on strong. now we have a race out there. richard carmona joins us next. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. if we want to improve our schools... ...what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ...nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers
and regards to tax policy. because an educated person, they know that the mass does not add up. host: thank you. this story from the washington post. plan would do little to lower tax rates. -- wilmington, delaware. dave on our line for democrats. caller: thank you for taking my call. a want to make two comments. first of all, in the last vice presidential debate, the moderator seem to have more control from the fact that the men were sitting at a table. and that close proximity to -- i gather that the attention to the moderator was better, versus the first debate were there was a distance between the speakers. and jim lehrer had much more trouble trying to control the debate. the second thing come on the first debate jim lehrer was asking each of the candidates to speak about the differences that they feel that they have with the other candidate. and sort of a different type of question, much more interruption. host: what you think of the choice of the four moderators? bobb and mandy coming up? >> fantastic. and i look forward to the town hall format. which gets more of the town hall and a
against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
, the right of education, the right for peace. so i didn't. >> some people might say, you're 14, you don't have any rights. you just have to listen to mom and dad. >> no, i have rights. i have the right of education. i have the right to play. i have the right to sing. i have the right to talk. i have the right to go to market. i have the right to speak up. >> what an amazing girl she is. and the taliban issued a chilling threat though today saying if the teenager survives this time, they will "certainly kill her the next." and toyota is announcing a global recall of more than 7 million cars. about 2 million here in the u.s. due to a power window problem that poses a fire risk. no accidents or deaths have been reported. the recall which includes a variety of models across multiple years is the company's largest since its infamous sticky accelerator issue back in 2009 and 2010. and if you've had your air bags replaced in the last three years, federal officials are warning they could be counterfeit and dangerous. authorities tested ten fake air bags seized as part of a criminal investigatio
of the expenditures in the tax code are not loopholes at all. tax preferences, things like a college education and retirement savings belong in the tax code even after reform happens. they were put in the code on purpose, to make a middle-class lifestyle accessible and sustainable for american families. tax reform recognized this in 1986 even as we cleared out the underbrush of loopholes, which preserved versions of the mortgage interest deduction, the charitable deduction, the state and local property tax deduction. realized that as much as we want to make the code more efficient, these provisions were two essential to middle-class households. we have to abide by the same principle today. if we seek to protect the expenditures that are most essential to the middle-class, we still hope to reduce the deficit and we will need to find alternative revenue sources. this leads to the second principle of this new model for tax reform -- the tax rate for the highest earners should probably return to clinton-era levels and stay somewhere around there. this will come as heresy to some of those on the ot
of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. swhooiter is. >>> young voters could be the key to a victory for president obama. annette taddeo joins me to discuss the youth vote and enthusiasm leading up to this election. >>> paul ryan e gets honest on gun laws while the national rifle association continues to spread lies about the president's policies. we'll have all the details. >>> and as the polls shift after last week's debate, will we get fooled again by mitt romney's lies? we'll look at what a romney presidency would mean for americans. share your thoughts with us on facebook and twitter using @edshow. we're coming right back. [ male announcer ] wouldn't it be cool if we took the nissan altima and reimagined nearly everything in it? gave it greater horsepower and best in class 38 mpg highway... advanced headlights... and zero gravity seats? yeah, that would be cool. ♪ introducing the completely reimagined nissan altima. it's our most innov
's just educating them. funny, the koch brothers, they say the same thing. darrell and charles koch sent a list of suggested candidates to 500,000 employees during the last election. monday, they launched a $1 million ad campaign in 13 states. they say they're just educating voters. all of these millionaire and billionaire bosses are supporting romney for several reasons. romney will cut their taxes and deregulate their industries. it's not about the workers, it's about using the workers to deliver greater wealth to these bosses. let's turn to robert reich, former secretary of labor under bill clinton and now a professor at public policy at uc berkeley and author of the book, "beyond outrage." this would take many employees, i think, to outrage, knowing that their job could be on the line if they don't vote the way the boss wants them to. mr. reich, good to have you with us tonight. do these ceos care more about their employees or their bottom line? >> ed, there's no question. they care not only about their bottom lines, but they treat their employees as costs to be cut rather than asset
life and through your education and politics, and you can change your mind, yes, i think that that is possible. but what i don't think is possible is for a president to make grandiose promises to carpet the world four years ago, knowing the miserable condition of where we were headed, and saying that he would fix this economy. in three years or less or he would be a one-term proposition, not even coming close to his promises. that is different. and i would say that this president's record is a record of making promises and breaking promises. and that is really his problem, why he can't stand in front of a debate moderator for 90 minutes and make his case in front of the american people. that is his problem, he didn't have a bad night, he had a bad game. he is not capable of bringing a good game if you don't have a good game to bring. >> okay, reince priebus joining us. >> he says he doesn't have a bad game, he has no game. >> well, it is not really surprising that my counterpart is being critical of president obama, when he has his own candidate, who as you said has not -
was an outspoken advocate for girls' education rights and had been critical of the taliban. >> a new flare-up in the increasingly value it will slow down or showdown between turkey and syria. according to the reporting of reuters, turkey scrambled two fighter planes to the border with syria after a syrian military helicopter bombed a syrian town on that border. we cannot independently confirm this. this comes amid growing tensions between the two nations. yesterday, the prime minister of turkey said that a syrian passenger plane that his air force intercepted was carrying russian made military equipment and ammunition. russia reported it was only legal radar parts. russia, of course, is one of syria's remaining allies. >> who won and who lost the vice presidential debate. it depends on who you ask. our political panel weighs in on that next. the guy would flew into the united states carrying a small arsenal had a court date today. we will tell you what else the prosecution found they say is especially troubling in that suitcase. that's coming up. [ male announcer ] how do you make america'
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 187 (some duplicates have been removed)